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TOP TREATMENT FOR Hand, wrist, ARM, Leg and foot Spasticity and CONTRACTURE

Hand, Wrist, Arm, Foot and Leg Spasticity & Contracture

Spasticity may develop after an injury to the brain or spinal cord, or may be due to a neurological disorder.  Disruption of messages between the brain and certain muscles cause them to tighten and become rigid.  Symtoms include: tightness and stiffness of the arms and legs caused by several conditionsor neurologic events, including stroke, multiple sclerosis, trauamtic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and cerebral palsy. Spasticity can affect just one body part, or both arms and legs, and can have a significant effect on everyday life.

  • Stroke - A stroke can damage small parts of the brain, resulting in speech and/or vision problems, as well as movement problems such as paralysis. Additionally, speasticity can develop weeks or months after the stroke.
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS) - In MS, the cover of the nerve cell fibersin the brainand spinal cord gradually wears away, reluting in a loss of movement and spasticity.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) - Many people experience symptoms of spasticity shortly after TBI.
  • Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) - After spinal cord injury, the nerve cells that control muscle activity can no longer receive signals from the brain. As a result, spasticity is common after trauma to the spinal cord.
  • Cerebral Palsy (CP) - The symptoms of CP appear in childhood and can persist into adulthood, affecting movement and coordination. It is not the result of damaged muscles or nerves, but rather, problems in the part of the brain that controls muscle movement. As with stoke, the damages part of the brain can also cause stiffness in the limbs that are associated with spasticity.

Spasticity can result in muscle stiffnerss of your elbow, wrist, finger, thumb, ankle, or toes, which can manifest as:

  • Bent elbow
  • Clenched fist
  • Bent wrist
  • Thumb digging into palm
  • Clenched toes
  • Turned in foot
  • Dropped foot

If you suffer from spasticity of the hand, wrist, arm, foot or leg, Alexander Spiess, MD can help. Dr. Spiess is highly experienced in the treatment of upper and lower extremity spasticity.

Whenever you’re ready to begin the conversation about plastic surgery for spasticity, Dr. Spiess is ready to speak with you. Schedule your first consultation today and take the first step toward receiving the best care UPMC has to offer.

Schedule Appointment

Man with Hand Contracture

TRAINED DOCTOR FOR compartment syndrome PAIN and volkmann's contracture IN PITTSBURGH, PA

Treatment for Hand, Wrist, and Arm Compartment Syndrome & Contracture

The first step in any suspected case of acute compartment syndrome is the removal of all external dressings, splints, or casts. It is shown that casts may restrict compartment expansion by up to 40% and should always be removed, a step that can reduce pressure by about 40 to 60%. In all instances, you should be checked in your local emergency department.  The primary emergency treatment for acute compartment syndrome is emergency fasciotomy. Failure to adequately diagnose a severe compartment syndrome can result death to the nerves and muscles in the affected limb. This will, over time, lead to a loss of function in the limb, the result of contracted muscles, and damaged nerves. When this occurs in the arm, it is called Volkmann's ischemic contracture.

Volkmann's contracture is a permanent flexion deformity at the wrist and fingers that results in a claw-like presentation of the hand. This presentation is due to the permanent shortening of the flexor group of muscles in the forearm and often presents with in pain in passive extension of the wrist and fingers.  

The key precipitating event of Volkmann’s contracture is ischemia of the forearm due to acute compartment syndrome. Any cause of compartment syndrome may potentially result in Volkmann ischemic contracture:

  • Fracture of the upper arm or forearm
  • Tight bandages and dressings
  • Animal bites
  • Burns
  • Intensive and excessive exercises
  • Muscle hypertrophy
  • Neoplasms
  • Bleeding into a closed compartment 
  • Injections in the forearm
  • Surgery on the forearm
  • Acute arterial insufficiency of the limbs due to clots

If you’ve sustained compartment syndrome and subsequent contractures and are seeking reconstructive surgery, Alexander Spiess, MD can help. Dr. Spiess is highly experienced in the treatment of scar and muscle contractures.
Whenever you’re ready to begin the conversation about plastic surgery for muscle contractures, Dr. Spiess is ready to speak with you. Schedule your first consultation today and take the first step toward receiving the best care UPMC has to offer.

Schedule Appointment